Galleons in the Philippines were built as Spanish trading ships which for two and a half centuries linked the Philippines with Mexico across the Pacific Ocean, making one or two round-trip voyages per year between the ports of Acapulco and Manila. The term “Manila Galleons” was the trade route between Acapulco and Manila, which lasted from 1565 to 1815.

In 1610, Juan de Silva ordered the construction of 10 big galleons and 8 galleys. The average cost was 78,000 pesos per galleon and at least 2,000 trees.

The galleons constructed included the San Juan Bautista and the almiranta San Marcos in Marinduque; another San Juan Bautista in Mindoro; the Espiritu Santo and the San Miguel, and six galleys in Cavite; two galleys in Manila.

Among those he ordered built in Bicol were the Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe and the Santo Ángel de la Guarda in the province of Camarines at Dalupaes (now Dalupaon); the San Felipe and the Santiago in Sorsogon at Bagatao; the royal flagship Salvador in Masbate at Mobo.

Dalupaon, a small village in Camarines Sur, hosted one of the Philippine shipyards and named it Astillero de Dalupaon, where two Spanish galleons were built—the Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe and the Santo Ángel de la Guarda.

Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe

March 30, 1612. Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe was dispatched in Acapulco, Mexico.

July 11, 1612. Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe arrived in Cavite, Philippines.

Santo Ángel de la Guarda

March 26, 1613. Santo Ángel de la Guarda left Acapulco, Mexico.

August 2, 1613. Santo Ángel de la Guarda arrived in Cavite, Philippines.